Image by Cassandre Boyer

 HME

Issue 1 : Nov - Dec 2020

Image by Debby Hudson

Imagine living at the very top of an apartment block, looking out over the world and watching the people down below, scurrying around like ants on a rather exciting mission. Our homes come in many shapes and sizes and the fascinating world in which we live is one  giant house with sights, sounds, calmness and craziness in so many different forms. Everything from where you get your water, to where you go to the toilet is shaped by where you call home. One thing they should all share though, is a feeling of warmth and love.

The launch issue of Our Kaleidoscope Planet Magazine celebrates all that home means to us and the people we share it with. With contributions from children in The Falkland Islands and Western Australia, we will open the door to a fascinating variety of places and the lives of the people that live there. We will also be showcasing some weird and wonderful houses from around the world, along with those that have played an important part in history.

We couldn't let this issue pass without looking at some of the homes around the world that are actually in danger though. We should be able to feel safe and secure once through the front door, but for some people this isn't the case and they spend most of their days trying to protect where they live.

Image by Dan Meyers
Image by Alex King

AUSTRALIA

The children of Vasse Primary School, Western Australia tell us what home means to them and who they share it with.

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THE FALKLAND ISLANDS

Surrounded by the South Atlantic Ocean, just what is home like for the children of the Infant and Junior School and Camp Education?

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Image by Fateme Alaie

OUR PLANET

We make sure our homes are neat and tidy, so why not our planet?

AUSTRALIA

Image by Alex King

We are situated on the continent of Oceania

We are below the equator, in the Southern Hemisphere and our capital city is Canberra.

Image by Srikant Sahoo

We are home to many of the world's most deadliest species

You wouldn't want to come across our  snakes, spiders, crocodiles and sharks! 

Image by David Clode

Our original inhabitants are the Aborigines

Although most aboriginals speak English, there are also 250 different language groups.

From surfing, to Uluru and world famous coral reefs, Australia is an awe-inspiring place to live. Sitting within the Southern Hemisphere, it is the sixth largest country in the world, after Russia, Canada, China, USA and Brazil. Much of its centre is uninhabited as the climate is very hot and hostile, due to this many people choose to live near the coast. Off the coast of Queensland you will find the Great Barrier Reef which is the largest natural coral reef in the world. Over 1500 different species of fish and coral call this home and every year thousands of people scuba dive to see this amazing sight. In contrast, Ayers Rock, in the very centre of the country, is hot and dry and creates a very different type of home. The aboriginal people are indigenous to Australia and have called it home for over 50,000 years. Uluru is the official aboriginal name for Ayers Rock and it is a part of their ancestral land which they still protect today.

Thank you to the pupils at Vasse Primary School, in Western Australia, for giving us an insight into their lives and homes. Let's see what they like most about them, from gooey home cooked lasagne to the sound of birds whooshing past the front door!

We would like to say a big thank you to all of the pupils, staff and teachers, for making this possible, especially Tasmin Drummond who has made sure that all of the brilliant work below was submitted.

Capital: Canberra

Population: 24.99 million 

Currency: Australian Dollar

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Home to me is my safe place, a place where I feel more like myself then I do anywhere else. Outside my house, in the frontyard and backyard, I feel very grateful to see all of the trees and birds.

Feeling at home, to me, is settling in and being comfortable in my body, wherever I am.

JASMINE,10

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

My dog is awesome!

My home is in a neighbourhood and it is right next to the highway. Outside all I can hear are CARS, LOTS AND LOTS OF CARS! 

My dog watches TV!

Home is where I feel safe, loved and happy and always have someone to talk to.

I like to make comics

My home is in a whisper quiet street, next to a big swampy forest, near school. From my home I can hear birds tweeting and frogs squeaking in the tiger grass and ferns.

I live on 100 acres

I live on a farm that I share with the wild and nature. From my home I can hear the laughter of Kookaburra's and the sound of the wind howling with the trees calling my name.

My home is awesome

Home is where I have fun and if I'm bored I can make a beat in 5 seconds! My home makes me feel calm because I've been there so much and I've been through tough challenges.

I love gooey Lasagne

I live by the blue crash of cold wet waves, by the sea and the whisper of the old oak trees. From my home I can hear the giggle of the birds and the scream of the wind.

I only eat runny eggs

Home means love, kindness and support. I can hear birds, cars, bike bells and chatter from my house. 

I like basketball.

I live next to a forest that I love exploring. Once I found a bike track! I feel safe and secure at home.

I have 2 webbed toes!

I live with my mum, brothers, fish and guinea pigs. My home is near the beach and outside I can hear birds chirping as they whoosh by.

I live by the sea

The place I live is great. In my town everyone gets along and no one is afraid to say 'hi'.

I love kiwi fruit

Home means shelter and people who care about me. Outside my house I can hear a cat meowing and the trees rustling.

I love my home.

I live in a town with my family. Home means everything to me as there is always someone there waiting for me.

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My home is really comfy and it's always clean because we do chores a lot so there's never laundry hanging or really messy rooms, for too long anyway!

AYLA,10

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

I am athletic

I live with my mum, dad, brothers and sister and my favourite home cooked meal is my Popus Secret Lasagna!

I love maths

I live near a park with my mum, dad, twin brothers, sister and 2 cats. My favourite home cooked meal is Tarragon Chicken and Mashed Potatoes.

I cry at every movie!

I live by the big strong waves and amazing gold sand. Outside I can hear my sister playing and then ghostly silence.

My finger bends back

Home means family, water, food and shelter. Outside of my home and I can hear birds flying by and cars driving over a wet road.

I love hockey!

I feel safe, calm and relaxed at home and free to create anything.

I have cool friends!

Home means everything to me and I share it with my mum, dad, sisters and dogs. My favourite home cooked meal is Honey Chicken.

THE

COOKING

CHALLENGE

Brody has shared his favourite Apple Pie recipe with us, so we thought we'd try it out too and see how yummy it is!

We must say a big thank you to Meggie Joy, our ever willing taste tester, who, at 8 years old, will eat just about anything!

THE

TASTE

TEST

by Meggie Joy, aged 8.

It was to die for, absolutely amazing! And with custard, yum, it was just so good! 

Thank you to the children, teachers and parents of Vasse Primary School, Western Australia.

For credits, please click on each individual image.

THE FALKLAND ISLANDS

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We sit in the

South Atlantic Ocean

We are 300 miles away from land, where wild waves crash against rugged cliffs.

Penguins

In The Falkland Islands, nature is in charge.

There is an abundance of wildlife here, including Gentoo, Magellanic, Rockhopper, King and Macaroni Penguins

Image by Grant Ritchie

We're a British Overseas Territory

The nearest land mass is the continent of South America.

Off the South East Coast of South America, 300 miles into the Altantic Ocean, where the waves crash against rugged cliffs and penguins gather, are a group of hundreds of small islands known as The Falkland Islands. The islands have a population of around 3,398 and the capital is Stanley, a small town with about 2,460 inhabitants, located on the island of East Falkland. The main industries on the islands are fishing, sheep farming and tourism, with many people choosing to visit the Falklands to see the amazing variety of birds, such as the 5 different species of penguin living there, along with numerous Albatross colonies, the biggest flying bird in the world.

 

Life for the children and families living on these islands is quite unique and we have been lucky enough to work with the Infant and Junior School and Camp Education, in Stanley, who have given us an insight into where they call home. From wildlife expeditions, to marine artworks and fun facts about family life, the children would love you to read through their work below and be transported to these amazing and isolated islands.

 

We would also like to say a big thank you to the Deputy Principal of the Infant and Junior School and Camp Education, Dorinda Rowlands, who has made the below possible.  

Capital: Stanley

Population: 2,840 

Currency: Falkland Islands Pound

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I feel safe in The Falkland Islands and I like the penguins, fishing and the snow. Home makes me feel happy because my family is there.

BEATRIZ DE LA CRUZ RAMOS, 6,

THE FALKLAND ISLANDS

THE

COOKING

CHALLENGE

Keagan has shared his favourite Beef Stir Fry with Rice recipe with us. He cooks it for himself and his mum so we thought we'd try it out too and see just how yummy it is!

We must say a big thank you to Meggie Joy, our ever willing taste tester, who at 8 years old will eat just about anything!

THE

TASTE

TEST

by Meggie Joy, aged 8.

In the words of our resident taste tester, Miss Meggie Joy, "The beef was amazing!! Can I have some more? But I don't like the peppers, because I don't like peppers." 

Thank you to the children, teachers and parents of  the Infant and Junior School and Camp Education.

For credits, please click on each individual image.

Our

Our wonderful world is facing many challenges and desperately needs our help.

Planet

From the environment to conservation we need to act now to create a happy future. 

Needs

Children around the world are doing lots of different things to help our beautiful planet.

US

Our world needs each and every one of us to make it better and grow strong, once more.

Falklands Conservation

Falklands Conservation protects the wildlife and natural environment of The Falkland Islands in the South Atlantic Ocean. From penguins to whales and changing weather patterns, they work to conserve the islands they call home.

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Falklands Conservation - Watch Group

Falklands Conservation run a youth Watch Group for 8 - 16 year olds where they learn about the islands natural wildlife along with the wildlife in the surrounding ocean and shoreline. Scientists, government officials and specialists, travelling through the area, all help with this amazing programme. As well as learning about the islands wildlife and natural habitat, the children are encouraged to actively help with everything from restoring native grasses, to using rodent detection dogs to ensure ground nesting birds are safe.

Due to the landscape of The Falkland Islands, the Watch Group often have to travel in 4 x 4 vehicles and even small planes to carry out their research. As well as monitoring the progress of their projects they also fly drones to create 3D images of the countryside, collect seeds and grow native plants, visit the meteorological station to release weather balloons, go whale watching, count penguins and study freshwater fish. All of this is vital to their understanding of the unique islands that they call home and how to protect them.

The Watch Group also use lots of craft based activities, such as mask making, to learn and explore their islands further. The first picture shows an albatross mask which helped the children learn more about the threats to this amazing bird such as getting caught in fishing nets and their fight to maintain their natural habitat.

In November The Watch Group will be focusing on introduced predators, such as mice, rats and cats. Through setting up cameras they'll be able to see just what comes out, when no one's around, and who they might be hunting!

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THANK YOU

Many thanks to Mike Ford, the Community Outreach Officer at Falklands Conservation, for providing us with a fascinating insight into their Watch Group. For more information about the amazing work that this charity does, please click on the link below.

CONTACT US

Please complete the Contact Us form, or email:

clairejoy@ourkaleidoscopeplanet.com

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